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POSTINGS

Red Sox Varsity Sweater and “Green Monster Butt” longies for my sister in law’s baby shower.  I’m not much of a knitter, and this is my first time making a sweater or completed longies.  There are lots of mistakes, and I think the two are different sizes, but overall I’m proud of how they came out.

I wish things weren’t so hard right now, and that I could have gone. There is nothing on the planet that makes you feel worse than letting down someone you love, especially when times are supposed to be happy.  I hope the love that was knit into these fibers shows that I do care, very much, even though I’m not able to be present right now.

Patterns (free through Ravelry)

DIY Cloth Pad Tutorial

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I have had several requests from friends to share how I sew reusable cloth menstrual pads, so I figured a tutorial was in order!  This tutorial is meant for folks who don’t have access to a serger, and want to sew pads that are turned-and-topstitched.

What you’ll need:

  1. PUL- a waterproof fabric that can be purchased online or at a fabric store.
  2. Cotton Velour- I like to use recycled track suits, just be sure the polyester content is 30% or LESS (so 70% or more is cotton.)
  3. Absorbent Fabric- this can be a thin recycled towel, or other cotton/bamboo fabric.  I’m using heavy bamboo fleece in this tutorial. You’ll have to use your own discretion with how many layers to use, based on how thick your fabric is, and how heavy your flow is.
  4. Decorative Fabric- can be cotton, poly, fleece- whatever! Just remember that the thicker the fabric you use, the bulkier the pad will be.
  5. Polyester thread, a thin ballpoint needle (size 9 or 11), and snaps (plastic if you have a set of pliers or a snap press, or metal if you need to hand-sew them.)
  6. A Pattern- many free ones can be found online.  I used this great pattern from Jan Andrea, that I altered to make the wings fatter (I find it easier to sew, since my layers never match up perfectly.) Be sure to adjust your print settings so it prints at 100%.

Ready, set, sew!  First, gather your materials. (I swear, whenever I want to do a tutorial, it’s a dark, gray day.  I hate artificial light photos, but it is what it is, le sigh.)

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When you print your pattern, you’ll want to do it twice.  Cut one copy for the whole pad pattern, this will be used with your cotton velour, PUL, and decorative fabric.  The other will be for the soaker (cut around the dotted lines), that you’ll use for your absorbent fabric.  This greatly reduces bulk when you turn and topstitch.

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Cut out all of your fabric pieces.

First, we’ll be attaching the absorbent soaker piece to the cotton velour top.  Center the absorbent fabric in the cotton velour, with fuzzy sides down.  Attach the pieces together by zig-zagging down the center of the absorbent pad, then straight stitch all the way around the outside, close to the edge.

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Trim any excess absorbent fabric so it’s cropped close to the outside seam.

Next, we’ll sandwich and pin all of the fabric together to assemble the pad.  I definitely recommend pinning with this step.  You’re working with 4+ layers, and it can be tough to get them all to stay put.

The sandwich should go- PUL on bottom, sticky side UP, decorative fabric next, good side face UP, then cotton velour, fuzzy side DOWN.

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Pin the layers together.  I usually can get away with just 3 pins down the center line, and two in the wings, but when I first started I used a lot more.  Your pin holes will be steamed shut when you wash/dry these on hot to seal your sewing holes.

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Top stitch all of the layers together.  On the curved ends, I trace a path about 1/8” away from the absorbent fabric. Leave about 1.5” un-sewn so the pad can be turned right-side-out. Try not to catch the absorbent fabric in this seam, it will help reduce the bulk of your pad.  I thin the wings in this step (see wing seams below.)

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Trim the excess fabric so you have about 1/4” around your seam.  Flip the pad right side out.  I find a chopstick helpful to poke out the wings and square those corners.

Fold the edges of your turning hole in towards each other, and pin closed.  Topstitch around the whole pad about 1/8” from the edge, sewing your turning hole as you go.  I try to trace the seams that are already there on the rounded edges.

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I like to sew a seam to hold the wings down and stop the layers from separating in the wash (can be seen in the above photo to the left of the seam from the absorbent pad.)

The final step is to add your snaps.  I like to put two “female” snaps on mine, because sometimes I find the second setting to be helpful. Wash and dry your new creation on hot to seal your sewing/pin holes, and voila- your very own reusable pad!

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Progress on my version of the Smoochie Monsterpants for Miss Vinka! Still not thrilled with my short rows, and the gusset is a mess (kitchener stitch is not my friend!),  but since this is the fourth time I’ve attempted these, I’m calling it good!

Progress on my version of the Smoochie Monsterpants for Miss Vinka! Still not thrilled with my short rows, and the gusset is a mess (kitchener stitch is not my friend!),  but since this is the fourth time I’ve attempted these, I’m calling it good!

Cloth Diaper Bonanza! Seren’s Shower Present

After sewing like a mad woman to get her stash finished, I managed to get all but 5 diapers finished for Seren’s shower last night (the last few are cut out and pinned, but I just didn’t have quite enough time.)  I’ve said it before, but her friendship means the world to me, and I was really excited to be able to take this on for her.

I focused on sewing her SM/NB convertible fitteds (her hubs loved these when his daughter was a baby), SM/NB covers and One Size covers. As she jokes, she’s not fluent in “diaper” yet, so she doesn’t have any idea what will system work for her. I’m guessing she’ll favor prefolds and covers, but you never know. So I kept her covers flexible- making most of them Flip-style, with the option to snap in soakers if she ends up liking AI2s better.

Enough chat- on to the pictures! Not shown are a variety of snap-in soakers, made in contour, half contour, and snake style out of heavy bamboo fleece. I used them to line the bottom of the basket.

The basket was part of the gift- and is meant to be used as a nursing basket for her once the babe arrives.

One Size Covers (Sprout Snap, Arfy T&T OS, Arfy Mock Flip and Mock Grovia):

NB and SM/NB Covers (DD Free NB, DDU SM, and Arfy SM Fitted enlarged a bit):

SM/NB Fitted Diapers- all topped with recycled t-shirts (mostly Arfy SM fold-in with added snaps for NB setting or Arfy SM with internal gussets and sewn-in soakers):

And lastly, gotta support the family farm!

I hope to do a future post about the patterns, materials, etc. if people would find that helpful.


After two visits from the Etsy fairy on Monday, I scrambled to get some more goodies listed yesterday.  My shop is looking slightly less comically empty, with 8 whole listings, woohoo!  

My major problem with Etsy has always been that I make jewelry at a lightning pace, but the time and effort it takes to photograph, edit, and list them takes longer than it did to actually make the items I’m selling.

I’m trying to become more disciplined in taking less shots, and doing a whole slew of photos in one sitting, so I can edit and list as the week goes on.  The result is photos that I am a little less happy with, but at least I’m able to be more productive.  In Maine, daylight hours are limited for about 8 months out of the year, so I’m stuck doing my photos only on the weekend if I want to use natural light.  This has always posed a challenge in keeping my shop running.

I still need to work out my preferred background fabric.  The burlap I purchased is too dark to work with most of my pieces, and the white canvas isn’t reading as well as I’d like it to.  It’s all a work in progress, and part of the fun!


Two more new listings in my Etsy shop today!  I’m enamored of the dark, swirling gray of the Calla Lilly earrings against the lustrous peacock pearls. Can you tell I’m a pearl girl?


New listings up in my Etsy shop, with many more to come! Today’s selection of earrings feature freshwater pearls, cloisonne beads, and filigree metal links. All proceeds are going towards the down payment we’re frantically trying to scrape together in the next 6 months- every little bit helps :)


Happy Samhain!  My dude and I celebrated our 3rd anniversary in style as our favorite fantasy characters from when we were younger. Our costumes are entirely homemade.  He went as Raistlin Majere from the Dragonlance series, and I was Polgara the Sorceress from The Belgariad novels.  Nerds FTW!

Finally done!  And with an entire day to spare…so of course, now I can’t decide if I should attempt to fix the straps tonight so I like them more in the front. I love how they look in the back, but I’m wondering if using black ribbon that’s thinner than the straps I have now in place of the teal will make it look less weird.  
As much as I don’t want a racerback, I think crisscrossing the straps might pull the bust to the center more (right now, they are smooshed flat and out to the sides because of how I placed the extra triangles of fabric in the side panels.)  I’d get rid of the straps all together if the top bust line wasn’t so clearly designed for straps. Le sigh.
And the biggest consideration of all- if I mess with it tonight, there’s always the possibility that I’ll ruin the corset that I spent a lot of time on, the day before Halloween. Conundrum! 

Finally done!  And with an entire day to spare…so of course, now I can’t decide if I should attempt to fix the straps tonight so I like them more in the front. I love how they look in the back, but I’m wondering if using black ribbon that’s thinner than the straps I have now in place of the teal will make it look less weird.  

As much as I don’t want a racerback, I think crisscrossing the straps might pull the bust to the center more (right now, they are smooshed flat and out to the sides because of how I placed the extra triangles of fabric in the side panels.)  I’d get rid of the straps all together if the top bust line wasn’t so clearly designed for straps. Le sigh.

And the biggest consideration of all- if I mess with it tonight, there’s always the possibility that I’ll ruin the corset that I spent a lot of time on, the day before Halloween. Conundrum! 


Final corset- sneak preview! I’ll be posting better pictures after I finish my whole outfit (please forgive the petticoat-as-skirt, lol).

There are a ton of things I’m not thrilled with about it, but I think I’m going to cut myself some slack that it’s not perfect.  It’s the first piece of clothing I’ve ever sewn, and it’s for Halloween, so I think it’ll do the trick.

I still need to sew in a hook and eye at the top and bottom of the busk to close the little splays (I should have gone with the 13” instead of the 12” for sure.)  The straps are just weird- mostly because I ran out of bias tape to go around the curved edges, and had to hide them behind the front of the corset.  They were supposed to overlap in the front and tie with a ribbon into grommets.  But I digress!  

I learned a lot, thanks in major part to Lucy’s (bishonenrancher) amazing videos. If you’re endeavoring to make your own corset, she’ll teach you everything you need to know (clearly and concisely, which is so appreciated :) )

Cheers!

I fixed the busk, but it looks like I’m still going to have to let out the bust per my coworker’s suggestion (cutting a V in the gold side panels and inserting small triangles of fabric),  Le sigh.

I fixed the busk, but it looks like I’m still going to have to let out the bust per my coworker’s suggestion (cutting a V in the gold side panels and inserting small triangles of fabric),  Le sigh.

I think I’m vetoing the contrast stitching in favor of it blending in more. Looks like I’ve got a date with the seam ripper!

I think I’m vetoing the contrast stitching in favor of it blending in more. Looks like I’ve got a date with the seam ripper!

The Corset Saga- Part Two aka. The Mockup

As you might recall, I had a minor failure with attempt number one of re-creating my wedding corset. After consulting with one of my coworkers, who just so happens to be an insanely talented fashion designer who made it to the final round of being considered for Project Runway, I decided that I would re-trace my wedding corset with a lot more accuracy, before trying to get all fancy and alter my failed pattern.

I used push pins to help trace the panels this time (pushed through the fabrics along the seam line through my butcher block paper below, both holding it stationary and marking key points) and really stretched them out well.  After creating my new pattern, I carefully ironed and traced my new pieces onto cotton duck to make the mockup.  

And drumroll please…

imageYahoo!  Not gonna lie, Shawn laced me up and I did a boogie around the house.  It’s sooo much better than the first go. The girls have support, I have a much more pronounced waist, and it’s pretty darn close to the original.

imageAll I have left to do now is even out the bottom and top edges, and fit the straps so everything lines up, and then it’s on to the real deal!  Only 2 more weeks until Halloween, and I have a ton of sewing ahead of me. Hopefully I can get it all done!

The Corset Saga- Part One

When I got married three years ago on Halloween, this is what I wore:

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I love, love, love this outfit. I ordered a custom corset created to my measurements, and my mother lovingly made me a gorgeous and impeccable 1890’s style skirt to go with it. 

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Needless to say, I haven’t fit into that outfit again until very recently. I did wear the corset for a steampunk production of Midsummer that I was in, and it was abused mightily.  I was too large for it to fit correctly, and the material they used on top of the corset wasn’t meant to be tight laced (stupid, stupid fine print- who makes a corset out of a material that rips under pressure?!?! ANYhoo…)

For some reason the other day, it popped into my head that since I’m now back to my wedding dress size, I should try to make my own corset for Halloween. And that I could use my wedding corset to make my own pattern.

Keep in mind that I have never sewn clothing. I have worked on a few costumes here and there, but nothing as involved as a tight fitting garment, let alone a corset.

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I did my best to lay each section out flat and mark key points to each of the panels.  I figured close would probably be “good enough”. See the areas along the seams of my corset that are much lighter?  That’s where the fabric has ripped away from the pressure. Sad face.

For the fabric, I decided to use some brocade that was also (ironically) present at our wedding. We made a bunch of table coverings out of various damasks to dress up the space, and this particular fabric was on the candelabra stands on stage with us for the ceremony. (And this lovely lady with the beautiful tattoos lighting the candles is Shawna- hi Shawna!)

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After doing my best to copy the pattern, I began to sew it together. I did remember to number the pattern pieces, but neglected to mark which seams needed to be sewn to each other so I ended up, ahem, sewing the corset pieces together backwards. I did this not once, but twice. Errgh. Have I mentioned before that I am working on my patience?

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Finally, after clearly labeling which edges needed to be sewn together, I was able to make progress. (Check out that pattern matching!!) I used two layers of cotton twill for my flat lining and inner lining. I planned to turn and topstich the whole thing, and sandwich the bones in between the linings.

Finally, I got to the point where I could temporarily place the bones, and give it a try.  I was sure it was going to magically fit the very first time! This was the result:

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Wah wahhhh (sad trumpet noise).  As you can see from the comparison, I somehow erased every curve I have. And there is zero support in the bust. Zero. The overall shape is very close. My back lacing panels lined up straight with each other when laced tightly. That will make the alterations needed much easier (I hope), because I think this means the pattern is relatively balanced as-is. I just need to let it out a little in the bust and hips, and hopefully, it’ll function like the original.

I don’t count this as a total loss. I now understand basic corset construction and how the layers have to interact. I know how the pattern pieces affect the final shape of the body. And I now get why making a “corset toile” or mock-up when drafting a new pattern is so important. Luckily, even though the fabric I used is beautiful, it was free! So this is sort of like a toile that could be a wearable finished corset for someone if I decided to finish it.

I went to Joann’s today and stocked up on what I need for my whole Halloween ensemble, including some heavy cotton duck to make the mock-up and refine my pattern. I’m very excited to see if I can make my own corset that actually fits- we shall see!

Click here for Part Two- aka The Mockup


Tonight was a whirlwind project! I hemmed and hawed over what to do about a coworker’s baby shower (which is tomorrow, hell-o procrastination!) I figured I probably already had whatever I needed for fabric, but the reason for the mess was because I couldn’t find any combo that I liked together. It took some creative seaming to come up with the final layout.

Out of the mess was born an “easy baby burrito maker” aka, a swaddle sack. When I explained to Shawn that it’s the “easy way to put the baby in the burrito wrap,” he looked at me like I had three heads.  

I made my own pattern from looking at others online, and I think this will work.  It might be a tad too big for the new-newborn stage, but it’s on par with the measurements I saw for many of them on Etsy. I think when I make it again (you know, because EVERYONE IS PREGNANT) I’ll shorten the wings so it can fit a smaller newborn.

I hope she likes it! She’s been really supportive- first when we were secretly pregnant at the same time, and later as I went through everything else. I’m not looking forward to the actual shower, I don’t know if I’ll go down for it. I’ll play it by ear and see how I’m feeling. But I did want to be sure to give her something special. :)

About Me

I'm KP, and I make things. I am a theater artist, DIYer, photography enthusiast, and cat-eye-bespeckled cat lady.








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